Garden experts warn against walking on your patio on January 29th – here's why

Slippery Decking Day is approaching – this is what you need to remember when your garden is at its 'peak slipperiness'

Snowy decking
(Image credit: krblokhin / GettyImages)

Deckings come with an abundance of benefits. They offer a space to host, relax and act as a talking point in any garden. However, in all their greatness, they come with an accident risk – that is particularly evident at this point in the year. 

And, while the entirety of winter offers a heightened risk, garden experts have labeled January 29th as Slippery Decking Day 2022. 

On this date, all contributing slip factors align, meaning your decking and patio are at their most dangerous. So, if you've got some new decking ideas to tick off your to-do list, the experts recommend waiting until the 30th, at least. 

What is Slippery Decking Day?

Decking covered in snow

(Image credit: GarysFRP / GettyImages)

According to Gripsure (opens in new tab), the non-slip decking company behind Slippery Decking Day, your decking reaches 'peak slipperiness' on January 29th. On this date, it is likely that the timber and composite decking boards will be wet or icy. They also expect your patio will be 'dangerously slippery' as a result of the build-up of algae and leaves over the season. 

And, if the slipping risk wasn't enough, Gripsure adds that the shortened daylight hours pose a further threat to gardeners. Slippery Decking Day also falls on a Saturday – a day when people are most likely to spend time on their deckings.  

With these factors combined, it is the day when even the best decking is at its most treacherous.

Snowy decking

(Image credit: krblokhin / GettyImages)

'It's fair to say that at Gripsure, we're obsessed with the slipperiness of decking. We understand the combination of factors that can make decking dangerous because it's what we've been tackling for more than a decade,' explains Gripsure's Managing Director Mike Nicholson. 

Mike adds that while they created Slippery Decking Day as a 'light-hearted event,' it has serious undertones – and hopes to raise awareness around the dangers of decking. 

'We hope Slippery Decking Day will make people think about changes they can make to enjoy their gardens all year round safely,' he adds. 

How can you stay safe during Slippery Decking Day? 

New Pine Patio Deck Floor Surface

(Image credit: JamesBrey / GettyImages)

The Director at Composite Prime (opens in new tab), Charles Taylor, revealed some ways to stay safe on January 29th – and beyond. 

He recommends investing in slip-resistant materials such as composite decking with 'numerous safety aspects. [These include] fire ratings, slip resistance, and anti-fungal properties. It also does not rot, splinter, or decay.'

When looking at how to build a decking, many people opt for timber. However, Charles warns that this material requires annual painting and staining – and can become slippy. 

'Composite, however, is a fuss-free eco-friendly option, created using a combination of recycled plastics and 100% FSC certified wood flour – a waste product of hardwood production,' he says. 

If you've already built your decking, remember to tread carefully on January 29th.

Megan Slack
Megan Slack

Megan is the News and Trends Editor at Homes & Gardens. She first joined Future Plc as a News Writer across their interiors titles, including Gardeningetc, Livingetc, and Real Homes. As the News Editor, she often focuses on emerging microtrends, sleep and wellbeing stories, and celebrity-focused pieces. Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and an expansive collection of houseplants.