How to make a Christmas door wreath: give this easy weekend project a go

Learn how to make a Christmas door wreath and give your home a stylish touch for the festive season

how to make a Christmas door wreath
(Image credit: Future)

Once you know how to make this stunning Christmas door wreath, you'll be amazed you haven't given it a go before. It's easy to make and you don't have to be a budding florist to pull off the cool and contemporary look. It's also a great feeling when you've created your own design and can step back to admire the finished version for the first time. So much more pleasing than opting for an off-the-shelf one. 

A door wreath is the must-have outdoor Christmas decoration as it sets the tone to welcome guests to your home (the few that will be allowed to visit you this year that is). Greet them with one of these and it will add the loveliest welcoming touch to your front porch during the festive season. Even without the usual number of guests visiting your home this year, it's sure to bring a smile to your face every time you come home, and that's got to be a good thing hasn't it. 

Keep reading for our easy step-by-step guide to making your own door wreath, then head over to our outdoor Christmas lights ideas feature for more ways to give your home a festive update this season.

HOW TO MAKE A CHRISTMAS DOOR WREATH

Christmas door wreath

(Image credit: Future)

You will need: 

Step one: prepare the foliage

Christmas door wreath

(Image credit: Future)

Remove all packaging and ties from your foliage. Snip about 5cm off the bottom of the stems. Strip off any leaves from the bottom half of the stems so no foliage sits in the water. If the pine and spruce are kept cool and dry, you don’t need to store the foliage in water. Place the foliage in a bucket of water and leave to acclimatise until needed.

 

Step two: start building up the foliage

Christmas door wreath

(Image credit: Future)

Begin with the spruce and pine cuttings. Snip down to 15cm-length pieces and remove any leaves from the bottom 5cm. Thread the pine and spruce into the weave of the rattan wreath, focusing on one area for a minimal look and fanning out pieces either side of this. Build on the foliage with clippings of eucalyptus to cover any bare pieces of rattan that might be on show.

Step three: thread in the sea holly

Christmas door wreath

(Image credit: Future)

Taking two sea holly flowers or thistles, snip down the stems to 10cm and remove any leaves. Thread into the centre of the arrangement, pushing the stem through the rattan to the back of the wreath. Secure on the reverse with a piece of florists' wire, tying the stems to the rattan.

Step four: add the pine cones

Christmas door wreath

(Image credit: Future)

Wire a pair of pine cones by wrapping the wire around the top of each cone and weaving down past the 'scales'. Twist the wire about 5 times at the pine cone base to secure, leaving 2 long tails. Position in the centre of the flowers, pushing the wires through the wreath. Secure at the back, then trim the excess wire.

Step five: fix the baubles

Christmas door wreath

(Image credit: Future)

Thread some wire through the hanging loop of a silver bauble and twist to secure. Push the wire between the pine cones. Add more baubles to create a cluster in the centre to draw the eye. Fix the baubles at the back of the wreath by twisting the tails of wire around the rattan wreath. Trim the ends.

Step six: add the finishing touch

Christmas door wreath

(Image credit: Future)

Attach a long piece of green velvet ribbon to the top of the wreath, making sure the arrangement hangs slightly off centre to the left. Tie the ribbon in a bow at the top to a door knocker and there you have it - one stylishly minimal door wreath.

Christmas door wreath

(Image credit: Future)

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Sarah Wilson
Sarah Wilson

Sarah Wilson has been a lifestyle journalist for many years, writing about gardens since 2015. She's written for Gardeningetc.com, Livingetc, Homes & Gardens, as well as Country Homes & Interiors and Modern Gardens magazines. 


Her own (small urban) garden is a work in progress  - so many ideas, not enough space to cram them in. Hero plants include her ever growing collection of ornamental grasses, black bamboo and ferns, and the perennials like salvias and penstemons that come back reliably year after year. All very restrained though when in fact she'd love to pack her garden with gaudy dahlias and giant cannas, so these are top of her wish list for what to grow next.